Collie Campbell Memorial Award

The Collie Campbell Memorial Award was created in honour of Canadian Collie Campbell who served as President of the International Curling Federation (later renamed the World Curling Federation) from 1969 to his death in 1978.

The award is a fitting memorial as the wording on the original plaque says:

“Presented annually to the player selected by his fellow competitors in the World Curling Championship for the Air Canada Silver Broom who best exemplifies the traditional curling values of gentlemanly skill, fair play and sportsmanship that Collie Campbell strove to perpetuate as a curler and as president of the International Curling Federation (1969-1978).”

Good sportsmanship was important to Campbell. He always said “Curlers do not need an umpire or a referee or rules. They govern themselves as gentlemen.”

He was a man of many talents, abilities and interests. His chosen profession was that of a Mining Engineer. In the 1930s he became one of the youngest members of Parliament in the Federal Government of Canada. Asked to join the Provincial Government of Ontario, he held the post of Minister of Mines, Energy and Resources. When war was declared in 1939 he immediately signed up and, because of his expertise and contacts with miners, was put in charge of forming the tunnelling company of the Royal Canadian Engineers. Over the course of the next six years, until the end of the Second World War, he distinguished himself well by rising to the rank of Brigadier General and received the Distinguished Service Order, the Order of the British Empire and other honours from Britain, France and the United States. Most of his leave was spent in Scotland ‘Bonspieling’. The curling contacts he made at the time were invaluable to him, particularly for his tenure as President of the Canadian Curling Association (1947-1948) and later for his work as President of the International Curling Federation when he transformed the Scotch Cup into the World Curling Championships.

YearAwardee (Country)Awarded at championship in:
2019SooHyuk Kim (Korea)Lethbridge, Canada
2018Markus Hoeiberg (Norway)Las Vegas, United States
2017Carlo Glasbergen (Netherlands)Edmonton, Canada
2016Kosuke Morozumi (Japan)*Basel, Switzerland
2015Kosuke Morozumi (Japan)*Halifax, Canada
2014Ewan MacDonald (Scotland)Beijing, China
2013Niklas Edin (Sweden)Victoria, Canada
2012Sean Becker (New Zealand)**Basel, Switzerland
2011Thomas Ulsrud (Norway)Regina, Canada
2010Torger Nergård (Norway)Cortina d’Ampezzo, Italy
2009Fengchun Wang (China)Moncton, Canada
2008Thomas Dufour (France)Grand Forks, United States
2007Ralph Stöckli (Switzerland)Edmonton, Canada
2006Ewan MacDonald (Scotland)Lowell, United States
2005Marco Mariani (Italy)Victoria, Canada
2004Sean Becker (New Zealand)**Gävle, Sweden
2003Markku Uusipaavalniemi (Finland)*Winnipeg, Canada
2002Pål Trulsen (Norway)Bismark, United States
2001Spencer Mugnier (France)Lausanne, Switzerland
2000Greg McAulay (Canada)Glasgow, Scotland
1999Sean Becker (New Zealand)**Saint John, Canada
1998Markku Uusipaavalniemi (Finland)*Kamloops, Canada
1997Jussi Uusipaavalniemi (Finland)*Berne, Switzerland
1996Mikael Hasselborg (Sweden)Hamilton, Canada
1995Peja Lindholm (Sweden)Brandon, Canada
1994Gert Larsen (Denmark)Oberstdorf, Germany
1993Hugh Millikin (Australia)Geneva, Switzerland
1992Jussi Uusipaavalniemi (Finland)*Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany
1991Markus Eggler (Switzerland)Winnipeg, Canada
1990Tommy Stjerne (Denmark)*Vasteras, Sweden
1989Tommy Stjerne (Denmark)*Milwaukee, United States
1988Bo Bakke (Norway)Lausanne, Switzerland
1987Gorin Roxin (Sweden)Vancouver, Canada
1986Uli Sutor (Germany)Toronto, Canada
1985Tim Wright (United States)Glasgow, Scotland
1984Mike Hay (Scotland)Duluth, United States
1983Keith Wendorf (Germany)*Regina, Canada
1982Rick Lang (Canada)Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany
1981Mark Olsen (Canada)London, Canada
1980Greig Henderson (Scotland)Moncton, Canada
1979Keith Wendorf (Germany)*Berne, Switzerland
 * denotes two time winner **three time winner